Following Jesus: Introduction

 

Purpose

Here you will learn how to help other believers develop a lifestyle of understanding and obeying the Bible – God’s Word. Helping to train other believers is the best way for you to ensure your own spiritual growth. This material is designed to help train you to follow Jesus with confidence and then, confidently train others to do the same. Check back here frequently for updates.

Goals

This training has the following goals:

Knowledge & Skills

  1. You will understand God’s agenda and how to align with it.
  2. You will understand the Gospel, God’s Kingdom, what it means to follow Jesus, and how to explain each of these to others.
  3. You will learn how to be an overcomer and live a life of victory in Christ.
  4. You will understand how to consistently connect with a small group of believers for deep fellowship, prayer, and accountability.
  5. You will understand what your sphere of influence is and how to bless people and represent God’s Kingdom within it.
  6. You will understand how to do outreach by regularly bringing new unchurched people into your sphere of influence.
  7. You will understand how to evangelize by being a Kingdom influence on people in all five stages of unbelief.
  8. You will understand how to lead seekers into a life of following Jesus and how to disciple them.
  9. You will understand how to help disciples discover their own ministries.

Lifestyle

  1. You will establish a lifestyle of representing God’s Kingdom within your sphere of influence.
  2. You will establish a lifestyle of outreach, evangelism, discipleship, and ministry development.

Challenges

  1. You will be able to handle an environment in which people are skeptical about Christianity.
  2. You will be able to handle questions raised by alternative religions in your environment (e.g. Jehovah’s Witnesses, Nation of Islam, Five Percenters, New Age, etc.).
  3. You will be able to handle questions arising from science and technology, politics, public policy, social science, etc.
  4. You will be able to handle the fallout from failures and scandals among Christian ministries.

Expectations

  1. This will not happen overnight, but it won’t take forever either. Expect it to take about 3 years.
  2. The Gospel of Matthew will be a skeleton from which you can hang various Kingdom concepts.
  3. You will use the Gospel of Matthew and the Book of Acts as a basic framework for both understanding how to follow Jesus and for instructing others.

Habits and Ministries

As your disciple works his/her way through our “Following Jesus” discipleship curriculum you will help him/her to:
  1. Develop godly habits
  2. Turn godly habits into skills.
  3. Turn godly habits and skills into his/her ministry.

Assignments

Most, if not all, of the lessons on this page include a section titled “Training assignment” appearing as follows:

Training assignment (do this yourself, and use it to help train someone else):

They are designed to assist you with training others. Use the assignments to guide the people you’re discipling into a deeper understanding of God’s Kingdom and the life of following Jesus. This will typically involve the following:
  • Listen to God.
    • Set aside a daily time to spend with God when you won’t be disturbed.
    • Use this time to pray. Ask your discipler to teach you how if necessary.
    • Keep a notebook that you can use to write down what the Lord says to you during this and other times.
    • Review what God says to you with the person who is discipling you.
  • Read some Bible passages.
  • Watch some videos.
  • Discuss answers to some relevant questions. The discussion is an important part of the growth process. The relevant questions will often include the following: Standard Discussion Questions:
    • What did this passage teach you about God (Father, Son, Holy Spirit)?
    • What did this passage teach you about people?
    • In what ways does this passage apply to your own life?
    • How are you measuring up to what God is requiring of you?
    • How can we help you in this area?

Following Jesus: What does it mean and why should I do it?

We begin this introduction with a central question that many people can’t answer correctly. Sadly, this applies to many who consider themselves to be Christians! The following 7 lessons will help you understand how to answer this question properly.

Lesson 1: God Has An Agenda!

God has an agenda and his agenda has implications for you! You’ll learn more about God’s agenda as you progress through this training but, in short, God’s agenda is to bring everything in heaven and earth under the authority of Jesus.
Praise be to the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who has blessed us in the heavenly realms with every spiritual blessing in Christ.For he chose us in him before the creation of the world to be holy and blameless in his sight. In love he predestined us to be adopted as his sons through Jesus Christ, in accordance with his pleasure and will —to the praise of his glorious grace, which he has freely given us in the One he loves.In him we have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of sins, in accordance with the riches of God’s grace that he lavished on us with all wisdom and understanding.And he made known to us the mystery of his will according to his good pleasure, which he purposed in Christ,to be put into effect when the times will have reached their fulfillment — to bring all things in heaven and on earth together under one head, even Christ. – Ephesians 1:3-10 (NIV)
Here the phrase “all things” includes everyone and that means you. God’s agenda further includes using you to help extend his rule over all things in heaven and earth. Sadly, it has been our experience that there are a lot of people who regularly attend church and who mean well, but who don’t really understand that this is god’s agenda!

Topics to explore in discussion:

    • God’s agenda.

Additional resources to check out:

Training assignment (do this yourself, and use it to help train someone else):

    • Watch the video.
    • Discussion Questions:
      • Before starting this lesson what, if anything, did you believe about God’s agenda?

Habits

    • Set aside time to reflect at the end of every day. Ask yourself what how you think God’s agenda might apply to the day’s events.
You have, most likely, heard various terms used to describe people feel some sort of connection to Jesus or church. We will now take a look at these terms:

Lesson 2: Believer, Born Again, Christian, Disciples, Saints, Saved – What’s the Difference?

The Bible uses many terms to describe those who follow Jesus: believer, born again, Christian, disciple, saint, saved: Those who belong to Jesus (i.e. “Christians”) hear his voice and follow him, empowered by the Holy Spirit. John 10:22-30; John 14:15-31; John 16:5-16 Only those who follow Jesus in a public, verifiable way are Christians. Merely going to church or claiming to follow Jesus is not enough! Matthew 7:21-29; Matthew 21:28-32; Acts 5:1-11 In Acts 2:1-40 we read about the initial outpouring of the Holy Spirit upon the church and Peter’s subsequent spirit-led sermon. Those who heard him responded: They devoted themselves to the apostles’ teaching and to the fellowship, to the breaking of bread and to prayer. – Acts 2:42 Here we can see that following Jesus includes:
  • Bible teaching and study
  •  Fellowship
  • The Lord’s Supper / Communion
  • Prayer
The rest of the chapter (Acts 2:42-47) shows them worshipping together, sharing what they had like family, and experiencing God’s supernatural power. It has been our experience that there are a lot of people who regularly attend church and who mean well, but who have never been taught how to actually follow Jesus. This training is for them!

Topics to explore in discussion:

    • The different words that people around you use to refer to Christianity and churchgoers.
    • The relationship between churchgoing and Christianity.

Additional resources to check out:

Training assignment (do this yourself, and use it to help train someone else):

    • Read the descriptions and the associated scriptures for each of the terms listed above.
    • Discussion Questions:
      • Consider the words we explored above: believer, born again, Christian, disciple, saint, saved.
      • Up until now, have you understood these words to be describing the same experience, or different experiences?
      • Can one or more of these words apply to someone without all of them applying to him/her?
      • Which of these words have you felt comfortable applying to yourself before today?
      • Which of these words do you feel comfortable applying to yourself now?

Habits

    • Adjust the way you use the terms listed above to be consistent with what the Bible teaches.
Hopefully, you now understand that the Bible uses all of these terms to describe the same lifestyle of following Jesus. We need to take a deeper look however at the term Christian, because you will find that the people who use this Biblical term often mean different things by it.

Lesson 3: What Kind of Christian Will You Be?

Relationship vs. Rules

There are two contrasting ways of dealing with God that we have to consider. We can deal with him via rules or we can actually engage in a relationship with him.

Rules

Most people seem to think of God primarily as someone who can only be dealt with via rules. Some of them hope to please him by “following the rules”. Others hope simply to “keep God off their backs” (effectively avoiding a relationship) by following the rules (in much the same way that we avoid a relationship with the IRS by following the tax rules). Scripture makes it clear that this approach is doomed – Galatians 3 – 4.

Relationship

God’s desire for a relationship with us is a constant theme throughout scripture. He could easily have cancelled the “humanity project” after our foreparents Adam and Eve first disobeyed him in the Garden of Eden, but instead he provided for them. He ultimately provided for all of us by sending Jesus, the one perfect man ever to walk the earth, to suffer and die for us. As a part of that relationship we see:
  • God has a plan for your life that will fulfill you.
  • You can have abundant life here and now.

Churchless People

George Barna has defined this group as those who have not attended a Christian church service (other than a special event such as a wedding or a funeral), at any time during the past six months.

Cultural Christian

At Life Church we use the term “Cultural Christians” to describe people who think of themselves as Christians primarily because they grew up in a church environment. Being in church gives them that “warm fuzzy feeling” and they assume that they are carrying out God’s will for their lives simply by spending time in a traditional church environment. They are often more committed to their church tradition than they are to what the Bible teaches and what the Holy Spirit is actually saying now.

Insurance Christian

We use the term “Insurance Christians” to describe “Cultural Christians” who are motivated to engage in religious activity primarily because they don’t want to go to hell. They often take the “rule based” approach to God that we discussed above.

Consumer Christian

We use the term “Consumer Christian” to describe people who engage the Christian faith primarily as consumers of spiritual resources. They evaluate ministries and make decisions about ministry participation based on how the ministry serves them. They pursue ministries that offer a “high quality” experience (e.g. the best Bible teaching, the most powerful singing, the most exciting youth ministry, the best marriage or singles ministry). “Consumer Christians” will often visit multiple churches, Bible studies, and conferences in their never-ending pursuit of more spiritual support. Unfortunately, “Consumer Christians” completely overlook the fact that Jesus taught us to receive by giving. They somehow never get around to sharing the gospel and making disciples because they are too busy receiving to actually spend time giving. For them, Christianity is like a shopping mall, a supermarket, or a restaurant – places where attractively packaged products are arranged on shelves for our procurement and/or delivered to us by smiling staff members.

Churchless Christians

These are people who otherwise fit into the “Churchless People” category above, but who consider themselves to be followers of Jesus. The number of people in this category is growing.

Disciple

A disciple is someone who follows a teacher in order to be like him/her. Christians who are disciples actively study Jesus’ words and history in order to be like him and to do the things that he did. Disciples actually expand God’s Kingdom by taking the good news of salvation through Jesus Christ to the people in their spheres of influence. For them, Christianity is not a shopping mall, supermarket, or restaurant – it’s more like a farm where they work with other disciples to grow the crops. The food in a shopping mall, supermarket, or restaurant is already dead and usually preprocessed if not ready to eat. On a farm the food is alive and growing. Disciples actively grow fruit for Jesus. They actively give birth to and raise new disciples!

Topics to explore in discussion:

    • What a relationship with God is like.

Additional resources to check out:

Training assignment (do this yourself, and use it to help train someone else):

    • Watch the “The New Humanity” video.
    • Discussion Questions:
      • How does the concept of “relationships vs. rules” above apply to your own life?
      • Do you know any “Churchless People”? Describe them.
      • Do you know any “Cultural Christians”? Describe them.
      • Do you know any “Insurance Christians”? Describe them.
      • Do you know any “Consumer Christians”? Describe them.
      • Do you know any “Churchless Christians”? Describe them.
      • Do you know any “Disciples”? Describe them.
      • Which, if any, of these labels have applied to you in the past?
      • Which label applies to you now?

Habits

    • Adjust the way you use the terms listed above to be consistent with what the Bible teaches.
By now you will hopefully have becoming a disciple is the right way to approach the Christian life. The main purpose of this training is to help you become a disciple.

Lesson 4: Become a Disciple – Start From Scratch

Now that we’ve considered some of the mistaken approaches to Christianity I want to try to set the stage for a more fruitful approach. Following Jesus as a disciple is clearly the approach to Christianity that is most consistent with what the New Testament teaches. There’s something more that we also need to see however. Consider the question of how the early church trained new believers. To do this, we have to approach the New Testament, not as 21st century evangelicals (or pentecostals, etc.), but rather as 1st century Jews would. Consider the state of mind of the Apostles after Jesus’ resurrection:
  1. They had spent the last 3 – 3.5 years of their lives with the most amazing human being that they had ever met!
  2. For 40 days after rising from the grave, Jesus opened up the scriptures to them and then he ascended to heaven after instructing them to wait in Jerusalem to receive power from on high (Acts 1:1-11).
  3. On the Day of Pentecost, the Holy Spirit Baptizes the 120 gathered disciples and Peter, filled with the Holy Spirit, preaches a sermon that results in 3000 people becoming followers of Jesus and getting baptized (Acts 2).
  4. We then learn that the new followers of Jesus devoted themselves to the Apostles’ teaching, to fellowship, to the breaking of bread, and to prayer (Acts 2:42-47).
Consider what Luke means when he writes “The Apostles’ teaching”. What would the Apostles have taught these new believers?
  • their collectively remembered stories about what Jesus did.
  • their collectively remembered stories about what Jesus said and taught.
For the Apostles, Jesus is the foundation! It is most likely that the first instruction they gave the new believers consisted of stories about Jesus. The following passages should help explain why this would be the case:
  • Matthew 28:18-20 Jesus commands his disciples to teach to others everything that he has taught them
  • Mark 16:15-20 Jesus commands his disciple to preach the gospel (good news) to everyone. This would obviously include the story of how Jesus own life embodied that good news.
  • John 20:30-31 John explains that he wrote his gospel so that readers would believe in Jesus and have life in him.
  • Acts 1:1-8 Jesus expects his disciples to be his witness throughout the world. Since witnesses tell what they’ve seen and heard, we can be sure that they shared with people the stories that arose out of their time with Jesus.
  • Galatians 4:8-20 The Apostle Paul is writing to Christians in Galatia (“known by God”) in whom nevertheless Christ has not yet been fully formed. How can this be? They have not yet allowed the story of Jesus’ life (including his death, burial, and resurrection) to fully take hold of their own lives.
  • Colossians 1:24-29 Jesus was crucified, buried, and raised from the dead, but apparently there are some afflictions of Jesus that still need to take place for the sake of his body. Paul and other workers like him complete those afflictions by presenting the full Word of God to those who will receive it – revealing Christ in those who follow him so that they can have the hope or expectation of glory. This glory is what God intended for human beings (Psalm 8), but we all have fallen short of it (Romans 3:23-24). That glory is restored (Romans 8:18-27) as believers become mature in Christ. “Christ in you” is not just a mystical experience. Christ is formed in us (Galatians 4:19-20) we keep his story fresh in our thinking.
Everything else in the New Testament is based on the life story of Jesus. The epistles were written to solve problems within congregations of people who had already been taught the stories about Jesus’ life. These stories were eventually collected, organized, and corrected by Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John into the four Gospels that appear in our New Testament today. This means that new believers today should be immediately and carefully taught at least one of the four gospels. Here at Life Church we have chosen to use the Gospel of Matthew. If we’re genuinely going to follow Jesus however, it’s not enough for us to have worked our way through a gospel at the beginning of our walk with Jesus. We actually have to make Jesus’ life story a regular part of our day-to-day life. Consider the following passage:

John 6:25-71

Here Jesus declares:
“I am the bread of life. He who comes to me will never go hungry, and he who believes in me will never be thirsty.” – John 6:35 (NIV)
and
  Jesus said to them, “I tell you the truth, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you have no life in you. Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood has eternal life, and I will raise him up at the last day. For my flesh is real food and my blood is real drink. Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood remains in me, and I in him. Just as the living Father sent me and I live because of the Father, so the one who feeds on me will live because of me. This is the bread that came down from heaven. Your forefathers ate manna and died, but he who feeds on this bread will live forever.” – John 6:53-58 (NIV)
Since eating is something we generally do every day, these passages imply that we need to feed on Jesus daily. This means that his life story needs to stay fresh in our minds. Naturally the Holy Spirit plays an important role in this:
  “All this I have spoken while still with you. But the Counselor, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, will teach you all things and will remind you of everything I have said to you. Peace I leave with you; my peace I give you. I do not give to you as the world gives. Do not let your hearts be troubled and do not be afraid. – John 14:25-27 (NIV)
Notice that the Holy Spirit reminds the disciples of everything Jesus said to them. It therefore follows that he will remind us of the things that Jesus has said to us, but we must give him something to work with! We have to make reading and reflecting on the gospels part of our lifestyle. Focus On The Message, the first component of our Following Jesus Discipleship Curriculum will get you started working your way carefully through the Gospel of Matthew with the assistance of a more mature follower of Jesus to help disciple you. At its completion you will also develop a plan for continuing to work your way through the gospels on an ongoing basis.

Topics to explore in discussion:

    • Common expectations about the Christian life.
    • What are the different parts of the New Testament?
    • What Bible resources to have and use.

Additional resources to check out:

Training assignment (do this yourself, and use it to help train someone else):

    • Discussion Questions:
      • Have you ever read any of the gospels (i.e. Matthew, Mark, Luke, or John)? If so . . .
        • How much of them did you read and how often?
        • When was the last time?
        • What stories do you remember?
      • Before you started looking at this training material, what were your expectations about the Christian life?
      • Have you had any past church experience? If so, how prominently did the stories in the gospels feature in any instruction you received?

Habits

    • Keep meeting with your mentor.
    • Keep working your way through these lessons.
Now consider what life is like for those new believers who never actually sit under what we’ve discovered to be the bulk of the Apostles’ teaching:

Lesson 5: Be a Disciple – Be Like Jesus

As you work your way through the Gospel of Matthew (and through he rest of the Bible), your goal will be to achieve spiritual maturity or, more specifically, maturity in Christ. At Life Church we use the following working definition for spiritual maturity:

Spiritual maturity is the ability to reproduce in others the life of Christ that has been fully formed in you.

The following passages emphasize the importance of spiritual maturity:
  • Galatians 4:8-20 The Apostle Paul is writing to Christians in Galatia (“known by God”) in whom nevertheless Christ has not yet been fully formed. He compares his effort to have Christ fully formed in them to the experience of a mother giving birth!
  • Ephesians 4:7-13 In the final verse the Apostle Paul states the importance of everyone becoming mature in Christ.
  • Colossians 1:24-29 In the final two verses the Apostle Paul make it clear how hard he is working for everyone to become perfect (or mature) in Christ.
  • Colossians 4:12-13 Paul reports that Epaphras is wrestling in prayer for the Colossians to become fully mature.
  • Hebrews 5:11 – 6:3 The author of Hebrews expresses his disappointment with the spiritual infancy of his audience and encourages them to go on to maturity.
Based on our working definition above, there are two key components to spiritual maturity:
  1. Allowing the life of Christ to be fully formed in you.
  2. Reproducing that life of Christ in others.
We must become like Jesus! Here are some passages that reflect this truth: We can only become like Jesus if we feed on the stories of his life presented in the four gospels. There is no substitute for this! Unfortunately, many churches today prioritize activities other than feeding on Jesus’ story. Believers who attend these churches may excel at quoting doctrinal points, enthusiastic worship, positive confessions, claiming God’s promises, etc. but they aren’t actually becoming more and more like Jesus. If this describes your situation, we encourage you to start over from scratch. Starting from scratch is exactly what this training will help you do. We realize however that there will be different categories of people starting from scratch:
  • Followers of Jesus
    • These will normally also be churchgoers.
    • They may use this material to improve their ability to disciple others – helping them to start from scratch if necessary.
  • Churchgoers
    • These may or may not be following Jesus in a publicly verifiable way.
    • After making a commitment to follow Jesus they may set aside their past church experience and start from scratch.
  • Churchless People
    • The researcher George Barna has defined this group as those who have not attended a Christian church service (other than a special event such as a wedding or a funeral), at any time during the past six months.
    • After making a commitment to follow Jesus then can use this material to get started right.
  • Churchless Christians
    • These folks are trying to follow Jesus without any formal church affiliation.
    • They may use this material to restart their church experience from scratch.
For those of you from churches that emphasize claiming God’s promises, please note that the promises that Jesus makes for provision are made to people who are determined to become like him – disciples. Before you start trying to appropriate his promises, spend time reading and absorbing the life of Jesus as presented in the gospel record. Before you get to “Ask and it will be given to you” (Matthew 7:7-12), you have to read through Matthew 1:1 – 7:7.

Topics to explore in discussion:

    • Common expectations about the Christian life.

Additional resources to check out:

Training assignment (do this yourself, and use it to help train someone else):

    • Discussion Questions:
      • Before you started looking at this training material, what were your expectations about the Christian life?
      • Are you ready to start from scratch? Discuss.

Habits

    • ?
If you’ve accepted what we’ve written so far, you will now hopefully understand that becoming a Christian means embracing an entirely new lifestyle. The process of embracing a new lifestyle has been well studied and I’d like to share with you two different, yet related models of change.

Lesson 6: Transtheoretical Model: Stages of Change

Transtheoretical Model: Stages of change

The transtheoretical model construct stages of change is used in the recovery movement with regard to an action like deciding to eliminate use of addicting substances. Many thanks to Al Copeland for introducing us to this concept!
  • Precontemplation (“not ready”) – “People are not intending to take action in the foreseeable future, and can be unaware that their behaviour is problematic”
  • Contemplation (“getting ready”) – “People are beginning to recognize that their behaviour is problematic, and start to look at the pros and cons of their continued actions”
  • Preparation (“ready”) – “People are intending to take action in the immediate future, and may begin taking small steps toward behaviour change”[nb 1]
  • Action – “People have made specific overt modifications in modifying their problem behaviour or in acquiring new healthy behaviours”
  • Maintenance – “People have been able to sustain action for at least six months and are working to prevent relapse”
  • Termination – “Individuals have zero temptation and they are sure they will not return to their old unhealthy habit as a way of coping”[nb 2]
In addition, the researchers conceptualized “Relapse” (recycling) which is not a stage in itself but rather the “return from Action or Maintenance to an earlier stage”.[16][nb 3]

Topics to explore in discussion:

    • The process of change.

Additional resources to check out:

Training assignment (do this yourself, and use it to help train someone else):

    • Discussion Questions:
      • Which of the stages of changes best describes your current level of embrace of Christianity?

Habits

    • ?

Lesson 7: Levels of Transformation

These Life Church Levels of Transformation are adapted from EHS Five Levels of Transformation: https://www.emotionallyhealthy.org/why-transformation-takes-so-long/?v=7516fd43adaa

1- Aware.

People hear about a concept for the first time (e.g. Sabbath, slowing down, past’s impact on the present, grieving, learning to feel).

2- Ponder.

People think about it, trying to understand or sort through issues as they gather more information. At this point they don’t have a clear inclination for or against it. (e.g. They continue reading, listen to messages, go through a course, learn a few skills, talk about it with others).

3- Value.

People think it’s important, find value in it, and commit to it, saying, “I really believe in this concept.” They begin to do a few new things such as related exercises, a daily or weekly practice, incorporate the concept into some relationships, or lead a course or a group. THE ACTION/BEHAVIORAL GAP

4- Prioritize.

This is the largest, most important shift for people (assuming they get over the action/behavioral gap). Now they have to shift their time, schedule, and energy to make the concept a priority in order to live consistently with their new value.

5- Own.

At this point, they live the concept consistently. All their decisions and actions are based on it. Their life and values are now congruent and they have become “unconsciously competent.” For further information on Bloom’s seminal work on how people learn, go to: http://www.nwlink.com/~donclark/hrd/bloom.html

Topics to explore in discussion:

    • The process of change.

Additional resources to check out:

Training assignment (do this yourself, and use it to help train someone else):

    • Discussion Questions:
      • Which of the levels of transformation best describes your current level of embrace of Christianity?

Habits

    • ?

What’s Next?

In this class you will grow spiritually by:
  1. Identifying others who are hungry for growth and who don’t have access to this training.
  2. Guiding them towards spiritual maturity by teaching them this material and training them to train others.
The training passes through the following phases or components:

Discipleship Components: The Seven “F”s

Focus On the Message

Begin by focusing on Jesus’ message and the Bible’s unified story that leads to him.

Family Up

Develop the understanding and discipline you will need to be an effective part of Jesus’ family.

Flow in the Spirit

Jesus is present in his church through his Spirit. Learn how to be led by the Holy Spirit in every area of your life.

Face Your Problems

In Christ you can face your problems and overcome them!

Farm Your Land

Learn how to function fruitfully wherever God has placed you.

Find Your Purpose

Discover the ways that God wants to use you.

Fulfill Your Mission

Accomplish the things that God want to do through you. These phases have a significant amount of overlap, so they are not completely consecutive. That notwithstanding, each phase builds on the one that precedes it. As your disciple progresses through these phases, you will help him/her to:
  1. Develop godly habits
  2. Turn godly habits into skills.
  3. Turn godly habits and skills into his/her ministry.

.

Resource Lists (for your convenience)


Advance to Following Jesus: Focus On The Message

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